News Scan for Aug 07, 2019

first_imgVancomycin-resistant Staph found in Egyptian camels, abbatoir workersAn investigation in Cairo has identified vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) in camel meat samples and slaughterhouse workers, Egyptian researchers reported in Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control.The researchers collected 200 meat samples from dromedary camel carcasses at three different abattoirs in Cairo and hand swabs from 20 adult male slaughterhouse workers. S aureus was isolated from 29 of the camel meat samples (14.5%) and 11 of the hand swabs (55%). Of the 40 S aureus isolates tested for resistance, 14 (35%) were resistant to vancomycin, with 27.6% of meat samples (8/29) and 54.5% of hand swabs (6/11) showing resistance. Additionally, all VRSA isolates were also classified as methicillin-resistant.Molecular analysis indicated that all 14 VRSA isolates harbored both vanA and vanB genes, and whole-genome sequencing of four of the isolates (two from camels, two from humans) revealed that the vanA sequences were identical to each other, suggesting potential zoonotic transmission.”Our research is the first in Egypt to report VRSA in camels, and we urge further comprehensive molecular epidemiological surveillance studies on the extent and potential zoonotic transmission of VRSA in livestock animals,” the authors of the study write. “Urgent interventions to control the transmission of these antibiotic-resistant organisms in abattoirs are needed.”Aug 5 Antimicrob Resist Infect Control study Miami-Dade County records 2nd local dengue case this yearMiami-Dade County, Florida, recorded its second locally acquired dengue case of the year, the Florida Department of Health (Florida Health) confirmed yesterday. The first one was in March, the Miami Herald reported.”There is a heightened concern of additional residents becoming ill,” Florida Health said in a news release. “DOH-Miami-Dade reminds residents and visitors to avoid being bitten by mosquitoes and to take basic precautions to help limit exposure.”Dengue is a painful mosquito-borne disease that is rarely reported in the United States except in people who acquire it from traveling to a dengue-endemic region. Florida Health has confirmed 75 travel-related dengue cases so far this year, according to the Herald story.Aug 6 Florida Health news release Aug 6 Miami Herald storyIn other dengue news, the Marshall Islands yesterday declared a health emergency because of a dengue outbreak, Radio New Zealand reported today.Officials have begun daily safety broadcasts and clearing of mosquito breeding sites after a case of type 3 dengue was confirmed on Ebeye island last week.Aug 7 Radio New Zealand story Study highlights low vaccination rates in premature infants in WashingtonA study of almost 2,000 infants born prematurely in Washington state found that more than half were undervaccinated at 19 months and more than a third had still not caught up by the time they were 3 years old, according to data published today in Pediatrics.The study enrolled 10,367 infants born in the state from 2008 to 2013, of whom 1,991 (19.2%) were born at less than 37 weeks’ gestational age.The researchers found that 47.5% of preemies had completed their recommended seven-vaccine series by 19 months, compared with 54.0% of the full-term babies. At 36 months, the rates were 63.6% and 71.3%, respectively. Full flu vaccination coverage by 19 months, however, was higher in some preterm infants; it was 47.7% in early-preterm babies, 41.5% in late-preterm babies, and 44.7% in full-term infants.The authors conclude, “The reasons for this are unclear but could reflect parental and provider factors, such as perceptions of medical vulnerability, vaccine safety beliefs, understanding of current vaccine recommendations, and provider-family vaccine communication, as well as health care use patterns in these high-risk infants. Future work is needed to inform the design and implementation of interventions aimed at improving timely vaccination coverage of these high-risk infants.”Washington has low childhood vaccination rates in general and is one of the states hit by this year’s record-setting measles outbreak, which has been fueled by parents not having their children immunized.Aug 7 Pediatrics abstract Malaria death toll in Burundi tops 1,800As of Jul 21, malaria deaths in Burundi rival Ebola deaths in neighboring Democratic Republic of the Congo, growing to 1,801, AllAfrica reported today.According to the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), the country has recorded about 5.7 million malaria cases so far this year, which means about half the population has been affected. The country has yet to declare a national emergency over the epidemic, however, the story said.The outbreak has been fueled by a lack of mosquito bed nets, climate change, and people moving from mountainous areas to the plains, OCHA said. Burundi declared a national emergency in 2017 after 1.8 million malaria cases and 700 deaths, but government leaders may be refraining from taking the step now because of its upcoming 2020 national election.Aug 7 AllAfrica reportlast_img read more

Olympics provide gateway to a brighter future

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How the Utah Utes broke Kentucky curse with thrilling victory over No. 6 Wildcats

first_img John Locher, AP Grid View John Locher, AP John Locher, AP Utah’s Both Gach, left, and Rylan Jones celebrate after a play against Kentucky during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas. Utah’s Both Gach (11) shoots around Kentucky’s EJ Montgomery (23) during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas. Utah’s Both Gach, left, Kentucky’s EJ Montgomery, center, and Utah’s Mikael Jantunen, right, scramble for the ball during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas. John Locher, AP Kentucky’s Tyrese Maxey, left, and Utah’s Lahat Thioune vie for the ball during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas. Utah’s Riley Battin, left, and Kentucky’s EJ Montgomery scramble for the ball during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas. Utah’s Both Gach, left, Kentucky’s EJ Montgomery, center, and Utah’s Mikael Jantunen, right, scramble for the ball during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas. Kentucky’s Nate Sestina, left, and Utah’s Timmy Allen (1) compete for a rebound during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas. John Locher, AP Kentucky’s Ashton Hagans (0) looks for a shot as Utah’s Mikael Jantunen (20) defends during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas. Kentucky’s Ashton Hagans (0) reacts after a play during the second half of the team’s NCAA college basketball game against Utah on Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas. Utah’s Rylan Jones, left, and Kentucky’s Ashton Hagans scramble for the ball during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas. Utah’s Riley Battin (21) celebrates after making a 3-point shot against Kentucky during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas. Utah’s Both Gach (11) drives around Kentucky’s Tyrese Maxey (3) during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas. Kentucky’s Tyrese Maxey, left, and Utah’s Lahat Thioune vie for the ball during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas. Kentucky’s Tyrese Maxey (3) falls in front of Utah’s Riley Battin (21) during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas. Utah’s Jaxon Brenchley (5) grabs the ball around Kentucky’s EJ Montgomery (23) during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas. John Locher, AP John Locher, AP Kentucky’s Nick Richards (4) shoots over Utah’s Lahat Thioune (32) during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas. Kentucky’s Tyrese Maxey (3) falls in front of Utah’s Riley Battin (21) during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas. Utah players celebrate after defeating Kentucky 69-66 in an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas. Kentucky’s EJ Montgomery reacts after a play during the second half of the team’s NCAA college basketball game against Utah on Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas Utah’s Both Gach (11) drives around Kentucky’s Tyrese Maxey (3) during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas. Utah’s Rylan Jones (15) gestures after making a 3-point shot against Kentucky during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas. Utah’s Riley Battin, left, and Kentucky’s EJ Montgomery scramble for the ball during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas. Kentucky’s Nick Richards (4) fouls Utah’s Timmy Allen (1) during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo Kentucky’s Nate Sestina, left, and Utah’s Timmy Allen (1) compete for a rebound during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas. John Locher, AP Kentucky’s Ashton Hagans (0) reacts after a play during the second half of the team’s NCAA college basketball game against Utah on Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas.center_img John Locher, AP Utah’s Jaxon Brenchley (5) grabs the ball around Kentucky’s EJ Montgomery (23) during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas. Utah’s Both Gach (11) shoots around Kentucky’s EJ Montgomery (23) during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas. John Locher, AP John Locher, AP Kentucky’s Nick Richards (4) fouls Utah’s Timmy Allen (1) during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo John Locher, AP Utah’s Riley Battin (21) celebrates after making a 3-point shot against Kentucky during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas. John Locher, AP Utah’s Rylan Jones (15) drives against Kentucky’s Ashton Hagans (0) during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas. John Locher, AP Utah’s Rylan Jones (15) gestures after making a 3-point shot against Kentucky during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas. John Locher, AP LAS VEGAS — It was exactly 43 years earlier on Dec. 18, 1976, that the Utah basketball team last defeated Kentucky in basketball when Jeff Judkins and Jeff Jonas led the Utes to a 70-68 upset victory in the finals of the Kentucky Classic.“I’m just proud of the guys. For our guys to stay in the fight, that was pretty cool.” — Utah coach Larry KrystkowiakIn the long stretch of time since, there were a succession of frustrating defeats to the Wildcats — eight in a row — including a 27-point whipping last year at Rupp Arena in Lexington. The Utes also lost to the Wildcats in the NCAA championship game in 1998, the Elite Eight in 1997, the Sweet 16 in both 1996 and 2005 and two other times in the second round of the NCAA Tournament.All those frustrations went poof in a stunning 69-66 victory over the No. 6-ranked Wildcats Wednesday night in front of a pro-Kentucky crowd at T-Mobile Arena.Somewhere Rick Majerus must be smiling.The former Ute coach, who endured six of those losses to Kentucky, once said the Utes just couldn’t beat Kentucky, but the long curse was finally lifted Wednesday night.Coach Larry Krystkowiak had said before the game that the Ute coaches and players believed they could win and they didn’t look the least bit intimidated as they jumped ahead in the opening minutes and never trailed after a brief 2-0 deficit. “I’m just proud of the guys,” Krystkowiak said. “For our guys to stay in the fight, that was pretty cool.”Krystkowiak said he took a cue from the Utah football team, which was known all season for its toughness and physicality and he challenged his players to play that way. “The first thing I wrote on the board in the locker room was that we needed to bring a level of toughness we hadn’t displayed this season,” he said. “Nobody was talking about our physicality, how we were on the soft side, the young side, all of those things.”Kentucky coach John Calipari also thought the Utes were the tougher team Wednesday. “How about they had three sophomores and two freshmen and they punched us in the mouth?” he said. “They weren’t beasts that way. What they did was they physically fought, they fought for position, they fought for rebounds.” John Locher, AP Kentucky’s EJ Montgomery reacts after a play during the second half of the team’s NCAA college basketball game against Utah on Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas Utah’s Rylan Jones, left, and Kentucky’s Ashton Hagans scramble for the ball during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas. Utah’s Rylan Jones (15) drives against Kentucky’s Ashton Hagans (0) during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas. John Locher, AP Utah’s Both Gach, left, and Rylan Jones celebrate after a play against Kentucky during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas. John Locher, AP Utah’s Mikael Jantunen (20) shoots next to Kentucky’s Tyrese Maxey (3) during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas. Kentucky’s Kahlil Whitney (2) tries to shoot between Utah’s Riley Battin, left, and Mikael Jantunen during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas. John Locher, AP John Locher, AP Utah players celebrate after defeating Kentucky 69-66 in an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas. The Utes also shot 54.8% from the field, the highest percentage a Kentucky opponent had shot all year, and were led by sophomore Timmy Allen, who scored 25 points and grabbed nine rebounds. Both Gach scored 14, Rylan Jones had 12 points and six assists and Riley Battin added 10 points.Gach scored Utah’s first 10 points as the Utes led 10-4. The lead got as high as 12 at 35-23 before the Wildcats finished the half on an 8-0 run to make it 35-31 at the half.Calipari said he was happy to be that close, saying it felt more like a 20-point deficit at the break.Kentucky clearly had the momentum, but the Utes came out strong in the second half and actually increased their lead to as many as 17 at 54-37 with 12:05 left before the Wildcats started chipping away.Part of the reason was that the Utes got a little too careful, letting the shot clock run down and either getting a poor shot or a violation.When Battin knocked down a 3-pointer from the left corner at the shot clock buzzer with 2:25 left, the Utes led 66-60. But two backcourt turnovers gave the Wildcats easy baskets and they tied it at 66 with 1:43 left.Allen hit a huge basket, a fadeaway 12-footer, to put the Utes back on top for good, and the Utes got a big break when a foul call on Battin with 22 seconds left was overturned after a review that showed Battin outside the restricted area under the basket.Jones made one of two free throws with 15 seconds left and two 3-point tries by the Wildcats, the latter with one second left, bounced away and the Utes celebrated the victory with a mob scene at midcourt.Jones had missed much of the past 10 days of practice after suffering a rib injury against Central Arkansas and he was just cleared to play this week. He went down hard with 4:52 left, holding his ribs, and had to be replaced at the foul line by Lahat Thioune. However, a minute later, Jones came back in the game and played the rest of the way.“I wasn’t going to stop him,” said Krystkowiak, who added that he didn’t know of many college players who would have played under those circumstances.Now it’s off to Los Angeles, where the Utes will play in the Hall of Fame Classic doubleheader against unbeaten No. 20-ranked San Diego State Saturday at 4:30 p.m. MST at the Staples Center. With the loss, the Wildcats fell to 8-2 on the year and will certainly drop out of the top 10. Calipari said his team has “issues” and will try to get some things solved before playing Ohio State on Saturday night, also at T-Mobile Arena.“They deserved it. Larry outcoached me. The way they did it — they outplayed us,” he said. “It’s disappointing, but they deserved to win the game.” GAME NOTES: More than 60 representatives from NBA teams requested credentials for the game and among those on hand Wednesday were executive vice president Dennis Lindsey, general manager Justin Zanik and executive director of international scouting Richard Smith from the Utah Jazz. … This marks the seventh year the Coaches vs. Cancer event has been played in Las Vegas. This was the third year at the T-Mobile Arena and the other years it was held at the MGM Grand Garden Arena. Utah played in the event in 2014 when it defeated UNLV 59-46. Last year BYU lost to UNLV 92-90. Kentucky’s Kahlil Whitney (2) tries to shoot between Utah’s Riley Battin, left, and Mikael Jantunen during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas. John Locher, AP Kentucky’s Nick Richards (4) shoots over Utah’s Lahat Thioune (32) during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas. Kentucky’s Ashton Hagans (0) looks for a shot as Utah’s Mikael Jantunen (20) defends during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas. Utah’s Mikael Jantunen (20) shoots next to Kentucky’s Tyrese Maxey (3) during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2019, in Las Vegas. last_img read more

New rules for carrying liquids into airplanes

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREThe Christmas Truce of 1914 proved that peace is possible160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! WASHINGTON (AP) — The government is partially lifting its ban against carrying liquids and gels onto airliners, as long as they are purchased from secure airport stores, and will also permit small, travel-size toiletries brought from home, officials said Monday. A total ban on such products, instituted after a plot to bomb jets flying into the United States was foiled, is no longer needed, said Transportation Security Administration chief Kip Hawley. “We now know enough to say that a total ban is no longer needed from a security point of view,” Hawley told a news conference at Reagan National Airport. He said that most liquids and gels that air travelers purchase in secure areas of airports will now be allowed on planes. He called the new procedures a “common sense” approach that would maintain a high level of security at airports but ease conditions for passengers. That means that after passengers go through airport security checkpoints, they can purchase liquids at airport stores and take them onto their planes. New procedures also were announced for toiletries and products like lip gloss and hand lotion that passengers bring to the airport. Previously, those liquids have been confiscated at security checkpoints. Now, these products will be limited to 3-ounce sizes and must fit in a clear, 1-quart size plastic bag with a zip top. The bags will be screened and returned if they are cleared. The new security regimen is for an indefinite period and will take effect Tuesday morning. Tougher airport screening procedures were put in place in August after British police broke up a terrorist plot to assemble and detonate bombs using liquid explosives on airliners crossing the Atlantic Ocean from Britain to the U.S. At the time, the Homeland Security Department briefly raised the threat level to “red,” the highest level, for flights bound to the United States from Britain. All other flights were at “orange” and will remain at orange, the second-highest level, for now. “Obviously, there’s been a lot of unhappiness,” said Richard Marchi, senior adviser to the Airports Council International, an airport trade group. “They’re right to find a way to ease the burden and maintain a reasonable level of security.”last_img read more