MACS parent acquires Hugo Stinnes

first_imgFollowing the acquisition, MACS is expected to close its transatlantic North West Continent to North America (MTA) service and join Hugo Stinnes’ SanMex breakbulk service, which currently calls at the ports of Antwerp, Bremerhaven and Bilbao, as well as Charleston, Veracruz and Houston.As a result of the transaction, Hugo Stinnes will also charter vessels from MACS, which maintains a fleet list of 12 multipurpose and breakbulk vessels, including the most recent Blue Series II, Golden Karoo, Bright Sky and Green Mountain newbuilds. www.macship.com www.stinnes-linien.delast_img

MP calls for appointment of local coach for Black Stars

first_imgThe Member of Parliament for Akrofuom in the Ashanti Region, Mr Kwabena Appiah-Pinkrah, has added his call for Government to appoint a local coach to handle Ghana’s senior national football team, the Black Stars.Mr Appiah-Pinkrah said that it was long overdue for Ghana to appoint a local or a full blooded Ghanaian coach with strong credentials who despite problems of national identity to handle the team effectively and efficiently.The Legislator made a similar call two years ago when Coach Sellas Tetteh, then trainer of the U-20 team, the Black Satellites successfully handled the team to whack the Greens of Libya 3-0.The MP then expressed loss as to why he should not be made the substantive coach of the Stars in their opening encounter of 2010 FIFA World Cup/Africa Cup of Nations qualifying match.Mr Appiah-Pinkrah told GNA Sports on Tuesday “I still doff my hat for those arguing that we should have a Ghanaian coach”, which is reminiscent of the exploits of local coaches such as C. K. Gyamfi, Osam Duodo, E. K. Afranie, “Sir” Jones Attuquayfio and Abdul Razak, adding that if these were considered old, why not consider the more recent big names like Kwesi Appiah, Sellas Tetteh, Kuuku Dadzie, David Duncan, Herbert Addo and Marcel Desailly?”.According to Mr Appiah-Pinkrah, the immediate past coach of the national team, Milovan Rajevac came to Ghana at a very good time in the history of Ghana football, when factors of a solid team, support and ownership were all at play. The MP who is also a football administrator and management consultant, made a strong case for parity of remunerations for a local coach just as a foreign one, in addition to the same level of facilities and motivation to be able to dispense with the good will of the team.Mr Appiah-Pinkrah said Ghanaian coaches had handled the national team successfully for the African Cup of Nations and wondered why they were not given the nod for the World Cup.He prescribed the requirements for the appointment for a local coach as someone who had played with local teams and to the highest level at the national team, has managerial training, have trained and educated as a coach and practiced as a coach at the highest level, in addition to engaged in physical education.“The coach must be able to manage human beings, and must have the ability to naturally bring in discipline, to accept the players and bring the best in them and win the hearts and souls of the players and the populace.“He must be part of the team and must be the Number 12 man on the field,” Mr Appiah-Pinkrah said, adding he must exercise high level judgment and intelligence. Source: GNAlast_img read more

POLITICS OF PAIN: Colorado largely spared opposition to painkiller limits

first_imgDENVER | Lawmakers and policy experts say Colorado legislators have been spared intensive lobbying seen in other states by the pharmaceutical industry to oppose restrictions on prescription painkiller sales.Pharmaceutical companies and related groups spent more than $130,000 in state candidate contributions over the past decade in Colorado, according to the National Institute on Money in State Politics. Those contributions came from the Pain Care Forum, a national network of drug firms and opioid-friendly groups. Nationally, the forum opposes regulations that would cut the availability or use of prescription opioids, especially painkillers such as OxyContin, Vicodin and fentanyl.Abuse of those painkillers contributes to the national opioid abuse epidemic that also involves illegal drugs such as heroin. There have been more than 6,900 drug overdose deaths in Colorado since 2006; more than 47,000 people died nationally, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.In Colorado, laws have expanded access to Naloxone, a powerful drug that can stop overdoses, and removed criminal penalties, under certain conditions, for those who might hesitate to report drug overdoses to emergency responders.A joint investigation by The Associated Press and the Center for Public Integrity found that drugmakers that produce opioid painkillers and allied advocacy groups spent more than $880 million on campaign contributions and lobbying over the last decade as they worked to influence state and federal policies. The groups have an array of political interests that include opioid advocacy, and their spending was eight times that of the gun lobby during the same period. By comparison, groups advocating for limits on opioid prescribing spent about $4 million.The investigation comes as the number of overdose deaths from prescription painkillers has soared, claiming the lives of 165,000 people in the U.S. since 2000. Reporters analyzed campaign finance and lobbying data from 2006 through 2015, reviewed hundreds of documents and conducted more than 150 interviews. The AP and Center for Public Integrity found that drugmakers and allied groups employed an annual average of 1,350 lobbyists in state capitals around the country and contributed to a total of 7,100 candidates for state-level office.Democratic state Sen. Irene Aguilar, a physician and backer of the Naloxone law, said she’s not encountered industry opposition to regulating painkiller access. And Lisa Raville, executive director of Denver’s Harm Reduction Action Center, credits the expanding use of Naloxone for saving more than 400 lives in Colorado.Officers with 22 police agencies in the state carry Naloxone, and drug-dependent inmates in three county jails — Arapahoe, Boulder and Denver — have been trained in its use, Raville said.Pain Care Forum members donated more than $441,000 between 2006 and 2015 to candidates for and members of Colorado’s congressional delegation.Republican U.S. Rep. Scott Tipton has co-sponsored legislation to provide more resources to physicians and first responders, improve addiction warning labels for opioid medications and encourage the use of non-opioid painkillers for pain management. He recently held forums on the topic throughout his 3rd Congressional District.“We haven’t heard very much from the pharmaceutical industry since this issue became a top priority for Congress early in the year,” Tipton said in a statement.“Most of us assume that if our doctor prescribes us a medication, it’s safe for us to take. Unfortunately, we’ve seen too many kids become addicted to pain medications and turn to substances like heroin when they can no longer get the pills.” This undated photo provided by Jennifer Weiss-Burke on Sept. 12, 2016 shows her son, Cameron Weiss. Weiss-Burke said her teenage son’s descent into drug addiction started with an opioid prescription a doctor wrote for him for a wrestling injury. After his death from a heroin overdose in 2011, Weiss-Burke pushed for a bill limiting initial prescriptions of opioid painkillers for acute pain to seven days. The bill exempted people with chronic pain, but opponents still fought back, with lobbyists for the pharmaceutical industry quietly mobilizing in increased numbers to quash the measure. (Jennifer Weiss-Burke via AP)center_img This undated photo provided by Jennifer Weiss-Burke on Sept. 12, 2016 shows her and her son, Cameron Weiss. Weiss-Burke said his descent into drug addiction started with an opioid prescription a doctor wrote for him for a wrestling injury. After his death from a heroin overdose in 2011, Weiss-Burke pushed for a bill limiting initial prescriptions of opioid painkillers for acute pain to seven days. The bill exempted people with chronic pain, but opponents still fought back, with lobbyists for the pharmaceutical industry quietly mobilizing in increased numbers to quash the measure. (Courtesy Jennifer Weiss-Burke via AP)last_img read more

Blinded by racial lens and political fixation

first_imgDear Editor,The other day the media kindly published a letter from me in which I underscored the need for a review of the criteria and system used to identify national honourees.In the letter, in addition to suggesting that the total annual numbers should be reduced, I also identified some factors that might be considered and some that need not be, because there are other means available to take care of them. There was no iota of racial or political consideration, overtly nor implicitly, in any of my critique or suggestions.I was, therefore, flabbergasted to see that practically all the “commentators” imported and assigned their own racial/political biases into my letter; they used their standard cowardly pseudonyms to hide their own disgusting and dangerous fixation. Of course, they were liberal in their ‘personal attacks’ on me, which do not bother me in the least, but which unfortunately serve as additional fuel for the dangerous societal fires that are already engulfing this sadly depressing territory called Guyana.When, oh when, my dear compatriots, will we break out of our obsession with race and politics so that we can start realising the true potential of our ‘dear land of Guyana’ for the benefit of all Guyanese?Sincerely,Nowrang Persaudlast_img read more