Mentally ill man slapped with 4 charges

first_imgA mentally ill man on Friday appeared before Magistrate Annette Sighn in the Georgetown Magistrates’ Courts to answer to four charges.He plead not guilty to all charges, which consisted of damage to property, abusive language, threatening language and larceny.It is alleged that on January 2, at lot 88 Duncan Street, Campbellville, Steven Jagru unlawfully damaged one wooden door and a zinc and concrete fence valued 0,000; property of Farida Khan.Also on April 5, he made use of threatening language to Khan. And on the same day at the same location, he also made use of abusive language to Farida Khan.Jagru who is said to be the Virtual Complainant’s neighbor, upon observation seemed confused when he failed to respond to questions asked by the Magistrate, such as his home address and his profession.This prompted the Magistrate to invite a relative of the man to give the information to the court on his behalf. It was then revealed to the court that he is of unsound mind.According to the relative, Jagru is mentally ill, lives alone but is currently receiving treatment for his condition.Magistrate Sighn then ordered a mental evaluation to be carried out on the defendant, to conclude whether or not he will be fit to stand trial.He was remanded to prison and will appear in court on May 4.last_img read more

Once And For All Michael Jordan Was Way Better Than Kobe Bryant

While the Los Angeles Lakers have endured a (predictably) poor start to the 2014-15 season, their future Hall of Famer Kobe Bryant continues to rack up individual milestones. In one game last month, he picked up his 20th career triple double and became the first player in league history to record 30,000 career points and 6,000 career assists. And after a 32-point outburst Tuesday night, Bryant moved to within 30 points of Michael Jordan and third place on the NBA’s all-time scoring list — meaning Bryant could pass Jordan in the Lakers’ Friday night game against the San Antonio Spurs.Jordan has always been an easy comparison for Bryant. The two men play the same position (shooting guard), are built similarly (both stand 6 feet 6 and weigh about 200 pounds), seem to possess the same maniacal work ethic, and even have similar-looking games. Bryant’s championship count, five, even rivals Jordan’s six. In the minds of many fans, Bryant is the closest to Jordan the game has seen since Jordan retired for good in 2003.Statistically, though, there’s never really been much of a comparison. According to most advanced metrics, Jordan was better than Bryant at both ends of the floor. (This is true even if we restrict both players to the same block of seasons by age so we’re comparing apples to apples. Kobe entered the NBA at age 18, and he’s 36 now; Jordan played from age 21 to 34, retired and played again from age 38 to 39. So their overlapping years are 21 to 34.)Offensively, Bryant can’t hold a candle to Jordan, mainly because of a disparity in efficiency. After translating both Jordan’s and Bryant’s stats to a league-wide offensive efficiency level of 106 points per 100 possessions to account for the changes in the game (the NBA’s overall average since it merged with the ABA in 1976), Jordan posted an offensive rating of 118.4 between the ages of 21 and 34, while Bryant put up a rating of 112.4. For a top scorer like Bryant or Jordan, an offensive rating boost of six points per 100 possessions can mean an extra four wins for his team in an 82-game season.Because of an effect known as “skill curves,” it can be misleading to directly compare efficiency numbers between players with different offensive responsibilities. (This is why Steve Kerr and Fred Holberg aren’t better offensive players than Allen Iverson and Carmelo Anthony, for instance.) But Jordan’s and Bryant’s roles were of roughly the same, so it’s a fair comparison; between the ages of 21 and 34, Jordan used 31.9 percent of the Chicago Bulls’ possessions while on the floor, while Bryant used 31.6 percent of the Lakers’ possessions when he was in the game. In other words, with essentially the same volume of the offense being directed through each player, Jordan was just a lot more efficient than Bryant at turning possessions into points.Why? Jordan shot the ball more accurately than Bryant, with a true shooting percentage of .580 to Bryant’s .556 — and that number even includes Bryant’s superior three-point shooting (particularly by volume) and a slight edge to Bryant at the free throw line as well. This means Jordan’s shooting advantage was almost totally driven by a better success rate on 2-pointers, where he crushed Bryant 52.0 percent to 48.5 percent despite the high likelihood that Bryant has taken more shots closer to the rim than Jordan did. (Even though a much larger proportion of Bryant’s shots came from three-point territory, Bryant’s rate of drawing fouls per shot attempt — a good proxy for how close to the basket a player is taking his shots — was higher than Jordan’s.)Jordan also protected the ball much better than Bryant. Between the ages of 21 and 34, Jordan turned the ball over on just 9.3 percent of his possessions, the best rate ever among players with such a high volume of shooting. Bryant isn’t exactly careless with the ball, but Jordan’s combination of a high usage rate, great shooting efficiency, a good assist rate and a microscopic rate of turnovers is what makes him arguably the best offensive player of the NBA’s post-merger era.Even when coupled with usage rate, it’s possible for individual efficiency numbers to belie a player’s true offensive contribution. A more sophisticated approach to measuring a player’s effect on his team’s offense can be found in statistical plus/minus metrics like Daniel Myers’s Box Plus/Minus (BPM). By that measure, Jordan helped his teams’ offenses by about 2.3 more points per 100 possessions than Bryant did between ages 21 and 34. We can’t be sure what a player’s actual on-court impact was before 2001 because we don’t have play-by-play data, but this reconstruction of regularized adjusted plus/minus for the 1990s (using box score and quarter-by-quarter score data) estimates that Jordan was, by far, the best offensive player of that decade. (By contrast, Bryant’s offensive impact ranks fourth relative to his peers.)Meanwhile, on defense Bryant looks like the Derek Jeter of the NBA — soaking up defensive accolades on reputation rather than performance. Over his career (which includes 12 All-Defensive team nods) the Lakers have only been 0.6 points per 100 possessions better than average defensively, and Bryant’s long-term regularized defensive plus/minus of -0.9 is below average. Synergy Sports, the video-tracking service that classifies every play a player is involved in, has the most favorable view of Bryant defensively but still considers him to be just a 55th percentile defender on aggregate since it began tracking full-season data in 2006-07 (a span over which Bryant was named to six All-Defensive squads).We don’t have Synergy numbers for Jordan defensively, but what evidence we do have suggests that he was better than Bryant at that end of the court. Jordan posted higher rates of steals, blocks and defensive rebounds than Bryant, and team-based defensive metrics like Dean Oliver’s defensive rating consider Jordan far superior (101.1 to 105.4; lower is better on defense) over the age 21 through 34 span after translating for era. Furthermore, the defensive component of Myers’s BPM lists Jordan as saving about 1.4 points per 100 possessions relative to Bryant (whom the metric considers a below-average defender). And while Jordan was in the top 12 percent of 1990s defenders by the aforementioned reconstructed plus/minus rating, Bryant was in the bottom 42 percent of his peers in defensive regularized plus/minus.Bryant will catch — and pass — M.J. on the all-time scoring list soon, but that shouldn’t be taken as an indication that Bryant has been a better basketball player than Jordan. To the contrary, the best statistical evidence at our disposal shows there really isn’t any legitimate way to make the argument for Bryant’s superiority. It’s only natural to hold the two players up side by side because of their superficial similarities, but a serious breakdown of the numbers renders all of those comparisons silly — the better player is Jordan, in a landslide. read more

Jim Tressel interviewed for Indianapolis Colts head coaching position

Former Ohio State football coach Jim Tressel has interviewed for the Indianapolis Colts’ head coaching job and will learn next week if he is hired, according to multiple reports. Colts owner Jim Irsay has reportedly met to discuss the position twice with Tressel, who served as a game-day consultant for the team this past season. From his Twitter account, @JimIrsay, Irsay tweeted Saturday at about 11 a.m.: “The #1 pick debate will rage on,what a great year to have it..the HC search is wide ranging n thorough,decision by mid 2 late next week.” The Colts did not immediately respond to The Lantern‘s request for comment regarding the team’s head coaching position. Tressel opted to postpone his term of employment with the Colts until Week 7 of the NFL season due to concerns about current and former OSU players who were suspended in both the NFL and NCAA. In Tressel’s final game coaching the Buckeyes, he led the team to a 31-26 victory against Arkansas in the 2011 Sugar Bowl in the Louisiana Superdome. That game, along with the entire 2010 season, was later vacated by OSU as part of its self-imposed penalties for violating NCAA policies. Tressel resigned from his post with the Buckeyes on May 30. This past season, the Colts posted an NFL-worst 2-14 record. read more

Buckeye Brief Slowing down Keita BatesDiop and more notes from Ohio States

Ohio State redshirt junior forward Keita Bates-Diop (33) takes a 3 pointer in the first half of the game against Maryland on Jan. 11 in the Schottenstein Center. Ohio State won 91-69. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorNo. 13 Ohio State (18-4, 9-0 Big Ten) is exactly halfway through its conference schedule with nine games won and nine games remaining. It narrowly edged out Nebraska Monday, 64-59, in its closest conference game of the season. Here are some notes from the postgame press conference. Keita Bates-Diop finding production despite tighter defensive coverageThe cat is out of the bag: redshirt junior Keita Bates-Diop is one of the best players in college basketball. The 6-foot-7 forward averages 19.7 points and 8.8 rebounds per game, shooting 50.5 percent from the field and 36.6 percent from the 3.Earlier in the year, teams played man-to-man against Bates-Diop. It allowed him to easily drive and to shoot high-percentage shots inside or catch wide-open passes from beyond the arc and knock home 3s. But teams have started to press more often in their coverage of him, double-teaming him to prevent him from having those open looks. His current four-game stretch has seen him average his lowest point rate (16.8) since he averaged 15 points per game from Nov. 19-26. The added defensive pressure has made it more challenging for Bates-Diop to find open lanes to drive to the basket. But against Nebraska, he said he was able to stay moving and would eventually find open space without the ball before catching a pass and making a play.“So I started slipping screens and just moving around a little bit more, cutting a little bit more off the ball and all my teammates found me,” Bates-Diop said Monday. “It was mostly just layups to the basket.”He had been off to a slow start, making only 2-of-5 shots from the field and struggling to find open shooting chances given the coverage. Ohio State head coach Chris Holtmann said he typically does not have to say much to Bates-Diop when he goes into a bit of a lull and that it is always just a matter of time until his star forward starts putting up points.“I just told him I’d like for you to score a lot more and go get 14 really quickly here,” Holtmann joked. “He’s getting a lot of attention. He missed some open shots, but he made some huge plays for us. And I thought our guys did a nice job finding him in the post late too.”Four games in eight daysWhen the Buckeyes went to the locker room after the game Monday night, they finally had a chance to really catch their breath. They had just wrapped up their fourth game in eight days with the first three coming on the road. “I definitely am a little fatigued,” senior forward Jae’Sean Tate said. “I mean you know that’s just the cards we were dealt. Especially this season with the tournament being moved up, it’s a little tougher. But I think as a team, we’re doing a great job. The coaches are focusing more on film and recovery.”Holtmann said the team did not discuss any change in approach to the four-game stretch, but that the players have worked additionally with strength and conditioning coach Quadrian Banks to avoid getting too worn down.He also said he wanted three of his starters — junior guard C.J. Jackson, Bates-Diop and Tate, who played 37, 37 and 33 minutes, respectively — to get more rest given how much they had played during that stretch. However, given how close Monday’s matchup wound up being, he was unable to rest his starters as much as he would have liked.“We’re going to continue to trust and use our bench,” Holtmann said. “We played seven guys over 20 minutes, which is kind of normal. But we need to continue obviously for Thursday. We need to probably utilize our bench even more if we can.”Andre Wesson and Andrew Dakich providing much-needed reliefPart of those bench players who have helped to provide key relief for starters have been sophomore forward Andre Wesson and redshirt senior guard Andrew Dakich. Wesson, who lost time over the summer due to an undisclosed injury, has worked his way back and has taken the role of the top bench forward. Over the past five games, he has averaged 21.8 minutes per game.Though he has only averaged 2.8 points per game over that stretch, the players and coaches have raved about his passing and defense being valuable coming off the bench. “Sometimes you guys may not see things that don’t show up on stat sheets, but he’s being a great defender,” Tate said. “He’s getting his hands on deflections, he’s boxing out his man, making sure they don’t get the ball, but also keeping balls alive.”Like Wesson, Dakich has not been the most productive scoring guard, averaging just 3.8 points per game over his past five games — with an average of 22.4 minutes per game. Unlike Wesson, he lacks the size to guard taller forwards attempting jump shots. He also lacks game-changing speed, but Holtmann said the 6-foot guard makes up for it with his awareness.“What he lacks in athleticism — and let’s be honest, he lacks athleticism — he makes up for it so much in his IQ and his ability to connect his teammates,” Holtmann said. “I did not realize he’d be this solid for us defensively. They tried to ice him tonight and people shot over at times, but he’s hard to get around.”Up NextOhio State will try to extend its unbeaten streak in the Big Ten to 10 games when it hosts Penn State at 8 p.m. Thursday in the Schottenstein Center. read more

Schalke director defends clubs transfer activity

first_imgSchalke 04 sporting director Christian Heidel insists their summer transfer activity cannot be held culpable for the club’s poor start to the seasonLast season’s Bundesliga runners-up total expenditure in the summer came to €52,7m after signing the likes of Sebastian Rudy, Suat Serdar and Omar Mascarell.However, Schalke have only managed two wins in their opening nine league games and find themselves 15th and just one place above the relegation play-off spot.But Heidel is adamant that the new recruits were money well spent.Jadon SanchoMerson believes Arsenal should sign Sancho Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 Borussia Dortmund winger Jadon Sancho might be the perfect player to play for the Gunners, according to former England international Paul Merson.“Before the season, we were praised to the skies for our new signings. The assessment in the media and the public opinion change rapidly,” Heidel told Ruhr Nachrichten.“16 out of the 18 Bundesliga clubs probably wanted to sign Omar Mascarell, Mark Uth and Salif Sané in the summer. We are convinced that our team is stronger than last season.”Although Schalke did claim a rare win on Wednesday after beating 1.FC Köln 6-5 in a penalty shoot-out following their 1-1 draw in the DFB-Pokal Cup.last_img read more

Week In Review 312316

first_imgWednesday 3/14Audio PlayerJennifer-wednesday-0314.mp3VmJennifer-wednesday-0314.mp300:00RPd20-Year-Old Killed In Head On Collision On Sterling Highway, Alaska Students Rally On Capitol Steps For School Safety, Ninilchik Traditional Council Launches Kenai To Homer Bus Service Monday 3/12Audio PlayerJennifer-monday-0312.mp3VmJennifer-monday-0312.mp300:00RPdPublic Open House On Cooper Landing Bypass Final EIS, Smoke-Free Workplace Bill At A Stand Still, BOF Meeting To Be Held On Kenai Peninsula In 2020 Tuesday 3/13Audio Player03-16-2018-THIS-WEEK-TUESDAY-FINAL.mp3Vm03-16-2018-THIS-WEEK-TUESDAY-FINAL.mp300:00RPdPremera Plans To Invest $50 Million Into Alaska Insurance Market, FERC Schedules Final EIS For Alaska LNG Project, UCI Northern District Closures Announced For Commercial Salmon Fishing With Set Gillnets, Fire Does Major Damage To Home Off Funny River Road, No Injuries, CES Reports One Fatality In Sterling Highway Collision Friday 3/16Audio PlayerJennifer-Fridya-.mp3VmJennifer-Fridya-.mp300:00RPdTroopers Increasing Patrols For St. Patrick’s Day, Homer City Council Votes Against Marijuana Establishments On The Spit, Alaska LNG Kenai Spur Highway Public Comment Period Extended, Sen. Murkowski Backs Bill To Allow Pot Business Bankingcenter_img Thursday 3/15Audio Player03-16-2018-THIS-WEEK-THURSDAY-FINAL.mp3Vm03-16-2018-THIS-WEEK-THURSDAY-FINAL.mp300:00RPdSoldotna City Council Member Submits Resignation, State Senator Seeks Public Input On SB91, Candidates Named In Upcoming HEA Board Of Directors’ Election, Kenaitze Indian Tribe Hosting Suicide Prevention Courses Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享The KSRM News Department compiled some of the top stories from this past week.last_img read more