Video: SA’s new surfing world champ

first_imgWhen Zoopy TV published a video feature on 16-year-old surfer Bianca Buitendag from Victoria Bay in the Western Cape, they asked the question: “South Africa’s next surfing world champ?” Buitendag didn’t take long to supply the answer.Zoopy’s video was first published in December 2010. On 11 January 2011, Buitendag beat France’s Justine Dupont to win the Billabong ASP Women’s World Junior Championships in New South Wales, Australia.Click arrow to play video.Published on SouthAfrica.info on 13 January 2011last_img

World’s Largest Intel FPGA China Innovation Center

first_imgAn investment in ecosystem partners to bring cutting-edge, customized, accelerated solutions to drive innovation and growth across data centric markets.It’s no secret that the pace of innovation is accelerating faster than we’ve ever seen before. A new era of data-centric computing innovation is being driven by not only a massive volume of data being created, but also a revolutionary change of data forms and formats which require end-to-end data processing. No single technology can solve every problem at the same time. From CPU and GPU, to FPGA and ASIC, to neuromorphic computing and quantum computing, Intel is planning future end-to-end computing innovation in a comprehensive way to fully unlock the value of data.Across many industries in the data-centric world, one of the most constant aspects is change—changing standards, changing product requirements, changing ways of deriving and adding value. Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) help customers maximize performance and keep pace with ever-changing workloads and evolving standards. That’s why developers who are tackling the toughest data-centric challenges are adopting Intel FPGAs. Combined with Intel’s end-to-end computing technology, FPGAs can unlock the power of data and are being used in fields such as artificial intelligence, cloud service, enterprise, 5G, autonomous driving and visual processing applications.More: Programmable Solutions Group NewsThe global tech innovation race has shifted into overdrive with the recent opening of Intel’s FPGA Innovation Center, a strategic project jointly launched by my team at Intel, the Programmable Solutions Group, and Intel China. Located in Chongqing, western China’s emerging Silicon Valley, the Innovation Center has been created to help our ecosystem partners in developing cutting-edge customized accelerated solutions to drive innovation and business growth across cloud, communications and embedded markets.Driving the Next Wave of Tech InnovationLaunched in collaboration with strategic partners including Dell EMC, AW Cloud, Zhi Xin Technology, and Terasic, the Innovation Center serves as an incubation hub for new startups and will help cultivate FPGA talent and application research working with Chinese FPGA research and development professionals from top universities. Housed in over 10,000 square feet of office space, it will also be the launch pad for top industry summits, thought leading training/events/seminars and global innovation competitions.This is truly an exciting time to be a part of Intel and to be working with FPGAs. The recent announcement of the new 10nm Intel® Agilex™ FPGA family is an important step in the continued investment in technology and ecosystem development, driving innovation across cloud, networking, and the intelligent edge. As markets are transforming, our customers are in a race to drive innovative solutions as fast as possible, which in turn is driving the need for fast time to market and highly customized hardware and software solutions—perfect for FPGA and CPU usage and ecosystem development.With the launch of our FPGA innovation center in China, Intel is shaping the data-centric future with computing and communications technology to power the world’s most exciting innovations.Stay tuned for more updates on our progress.last_img read more

Men add more colour to their wardrobes, lives

first_imgPretty Picture: An Ashish-Smita Soni shirt for Be: with pink flowersIn the age of the metrosexual, when men are willing to shed machismo and embrace sentiment, the attitude is reflecting in sartorial tastes too. The stuffed shirts with their staid solids, checks and pinstripes are bowing out to colours, frills,Pretty Picture: An Ashish-Smita Soni shirt for Be: with pink flowersIn the age of the metrosexual, when men are willing to shed machismo and embrace sentiment, the attitude is reflecting in sartorial tastes too. The stuffed shirts with their staid solids, checks and pinstripes are bowing out to colours, frills and funk. Office wear and Friday dressing are taking a beating as lounge wear and club wear take centrestage. Men’s wardrobes are beginning to resemble the women’s, with embroidered collars, patchwork pieces and retro prints.Fashion Week 2005 saw designers creating for the bolder, adventurous man. Arjun Khanna’s creations had a lot of dori work on a profusion of colours.Abhishek Gupta went psychedelic and retro with funky T-shirts. While Anamika Khanna’s belted shirts had bold prints and Narendra Kumar Ahmed’s men wore rich prints and bright yellow, Lalit and Sunita Jalan presented a playful collection for “modern intersexual wanderers”.It is not just designers with individualistic palettes who are rooting for change. Even traditional shirt brands are offering men that extra bit of flair in the basic shirt.From florid fun and polka dots to tattoo art and animal prints, all of men’s fancies are being catered to. “Today, men are willing to experiment with colours, textures, prints, silhouettes and embroidery. This was unheard of a few years ago,” says designer Umesh Jivnani, who works with matt sequins, mirrors and stones. Corporate Chic: A shirt from Provogue’s Kaleidoscope collection”Men are tiring of wearing ties and suits,” he adds, claiming that blazers and formal suits are being replaced by trendy, smart shirts for evening wear in most men’s wardrobes. “I did a pop art tattoo line for Tuscan Verve which met with huge success all over India,” says the designer who also functions as creative director for Tuscan Verve.Manish Malhotra, who is pioneering change in menswear much the way he revolutionised Bollywood fashion years ago, first introduced a line of shirts with a generous smattering of flowers, complemented by colourful, contrasting cuffs and collars. Not surprising, when one can spot the man himself sporting sequins on a pinstriped shirt or a brocade patchwork on solids.From the catwalk to store racks, bringing a touch of folkloric florals to the spring-summer collection at Be:-which has outlets across the country-is Delhi-based designer Rohit Bal, whose floral and polka-dotted appliqu shirts have been flying off the racks. Priyadarshini Rao is rejoicing at the freedom to explore. “Men are willing to experiment with cuffs, larger collars and shapes closer to the body. It gives us the freedom to work with different fabrics and cuts,” she says. Her new collection combines raw edge detailing-a relatively unfinished look for the masculine touch-with feminine style provided by floral and paisley motifs.”Our male customers enjoy wearing shirts which stand out and look different,” says Paulomi Dhawan, director, Be:. Making Waves: Tuscan Verve’s bold shirts are for the adventurous menThis season Be: designers like Bal, Rao, Manish Arora, Savio Jon, Abhishek Gupta, Rajesh Pratap Singh, Ashish and Smita Soni, Wendell Rodricks, Shantanu & Nikhil and Akbar Shahpurwala have designed unconventional shirts for men. Going by the customers’ response to the new line, Dhawan says the prints-inspired by nature, the 1980s and exotic locales- will continue to set trends.While brands like Zod! and Charagh Din cater to the party preppies, Tuscan Verve managed to keep abreast of the competition by earlier launching a lounge-wear line, Lounge Bohemia, followed by Club Aphrodisia, which with its attitude, bright colours, pop prints and assorted psychedelia was aimed at the more adventurous. Their springsummer 2005 line, I Meets Me, has linens, cottons and blends in summer colours like bubblegum pink, aqua blues and limes in candy stripes and florals with a strong emphasis on cut. Trend MeterPriyadarshini Rao: Hernew collection combinesraw edge detailingwith a touch of floraland paisley motifs.Nikhil and Shantanu:The year ahead will seepaisley prints, Africanmotifs, applique andpatches.Umesh Jivnani: He predictsa line of smartshirts in bright colourswith self-embroideryand floral prints.Lascelle Symons: Thinkpink. Baby pink tobright fuchsia is thecolour to look out for inmen’s shirts.”Our niche market is the rich-daddy kid and the yuppie, and it is growing,” says Sanjeev Wadhwani, managing director, Tuscan Verve. While Wadhwani agrees the brand is doing well mainly in metros and urban markets, the segment, he says, is growing.Another brand that has gone from functional to funky is Provogue with its earlier Metroscape and Casino collections, which comprised bold prints and slinkier silhouettes. Provogue’s latest style statement is Kaleidoscope with its bright linens, graphic prints, added glamour and a distinct retro feel. “Even in smaller cities like Lucknow, Kanpur and Pune the youth have become very fashion conscious,” says Nikhil Chaturvedi, managing director, Provogue.Another youthful but classic line of shirts was launched by model-turned designer Lascelle Symons. “The shirts are embroidered with a vintage architectural design on tapered and contemporary cuts,” he says. And though the shirts come in subtle colours, 26-56 shades of embroidery have been used. This when embroidery on men’s shirt was unheard of earlier.But is the Indian male ready for the colour onslaught and flamboyant shift? At least he is ready to appreciate the change if not accept it completely, says Symons. Wadhwani believes consumers have actually been looking forward to the change. So if style gurus are to be believed, the sparkling embroidered shirts, dual-toned cuffs and patches of brocade are here to stay. Men will be adding a lot more colour to their lives. advertisementadvertisementlast_img read more

Graphic Designer Makes Concept Uniform For Notre Dame’s ‘Shamrock Series’

first_imgNotre Dame's mascot running with a flag on the football field.SOUTH BEND, IN – SEPTEMBER 17: The Notre Dame Fighting Irish mascot carries the school flag on the field before the game against the Michigan State Spartans on September 17, 2005 at Notre Dame Stadium in South Bend, Indiana. (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)Last week, Notre Dame unveiled its ‘Shamrock Series’ uniforms for this year’s game against Navy – and suffice to say, most fans weren’t impressed. One graphic designer came up with a different take on the event, and we imagine Fighting Irish supporters will like it a bit better.Next Gen Uniforms released a concept uniform that focuses on green and gold. It includes Notre Dame’s interlocking logo on the helmet and stripes on the shoulders. It’s a clean look. Notre Dame fans – what do you think?last_img