News / Launch of JV sets Turkish Cargo on a course for Chinese logistics sector

first_img Turkish Cargo has set its sights on the Chinese market with the announcement of a joint-venture with ZTO Express and PAL Air, offering door-to-door logistics services.Based in Hong Kong, the JV – which has its eyes firmly on the $300bn-plus e-commerce sector – can also provide order management, supply chain and warehouse management services.Chairman of Turkish Airlines Ilker Ayci said the JV, believed to be named Global Ekspres, would generate more than $2bn in revenue by 2023.“Istanbul New Airport will be open by 29 October and will function as our main hub, gradually providing Turkish Cargo up to four million tonnes of handling capacity,” he added. By Alexander Whiteman 11/06/2018 “The flow of e-commerce products globally with this joint-venture via the Istanbul mega-hub will provide maximum value to our customers worldwide.”At a signing ceremony today, ZTO chairman Mei Song Lai said the e-commerce sector was providing significant growth opportunities for express operators. Last year, ZTO’s parcel volumes exceeded 6.22bn, with Mr Lai noting its focus was now moving towards cross-border markets.“The three partners will form synergy by combining strong core competencies and integrating key resources,”  added Mr Lai. “It will undoubtfully effect positive progress in global express delivery, warehousing, cargo freight and route development, and ultimately benefit traders and consumers globally.”The express market has been forecast to grow by some $80bn between 2016 and 2020, with a further $60bn surge by 2023, leading to a market valued in excess of $400bn.Under the JV, ZTO and PAL will have greater access to global destinations, while Turkish will benefit by getting its foot into the express segment.Vice chairman of PAL Vivian Lau described the present era as “one of the most exciting times in human history”, adding that PAL was “honoured” to be part of the JV.center_img L to R: ZTO chairman Mei Song Lai, Turkish Airlines chairman Ilker Ayci, vice chair of PAL, Vivian Lau, Turhan Özen, Turkish chief cargo officerlast_img read more

FDLE correctional officer arrested for murder

first_imgNorth Port man arrested for sexual battery on child March 12, 2021 WATCH LIVE: FDLE announces results of theft ring operation May 27, 2021 Former Marco Island city councilman accused of forging condo election ballots February 8, 2021 Advertisement 6-year-old kidnapped from North Fort Myers psychic center found safe April 16, 2021 CLERMONT, Fla. – A correctional officer for the Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) has been arrested for the murder of an inmate. Michael Riley Jr., 27, was arrested Monday for second-degree murder after the death of an inmate at the Lake Correctional Institution in June, according to FDLE. The investigation that began June 18 showed the inmate died “as a result of actions taken by Riley,” but did not specify exactly how the inmate was killed.Riley is in custody at the Polk County Jail. The case will be prosecuted by the Office of the State Attorney, 5th Judicial District. AdvertisementTags: Correctional officerFDLEcenter_img Advertisement AdvertisementRecommended ArticlesBrie Larson Reportedly Replacing Robert Downey Jr. As The Face Of The MCURead more81 commentsGal Gadot Reportedly Being Recast As Wonder Woman For The FlashRead more29 comments RELATEDTOPICS AdvertisementDC Young Fly knocks out heckler (video) – Rolling OutRead more6 comments’Mortal Kombat’ Exceeded Expectations Says WarnerMedia ExecutiveRead more2 commentsDo You Remember Bob’s Big Boy?Read more1 commentsKISS Front Man Paul Stanley Reveals This Is The End Of KISS As A Touring Band, For RealRead more1 comments Advertisementlast_img read more

Big increase in number of cases of Coronavirus in Laois

first_img News Home News Big increase in number of cases of Coronavirus in Laois News The vast majority of the cases, 3,873, are in Dublin with Cork next on 503.This comes on a day that Ireland’s confirmed cases went up by 480 to go to 7,054 overall.However, when the number of cases that were tested in Germany and came back as positive – the total number of cases is 8,089.While now 288 people have died from the disease – an increase of 25 from yesterday.SEE ALSO – 480 new cases of Coronavirus in Ireland and 25 more deaths Laois Councillor ‘amazed’ at Electric Picnic decision to apply for later date for 2021 festival Big increase in number of cases of Coronavirus in Laois Pinterest WhatsApp Facebook Twitter Twitter TAGSCoronavirusCovid-19 By Alan Hartnett – 10th April 2020 Pinterest Electric Picnic organisers release statement following confirmation of new festival date The number of confirmed cases of Coronavirus in Laois from the latest Department of Health figures is 49.These figures come from April 8 and are the latest available – an increase of 12 of the previous day.This is still relatively low when compared with our Midlands neighbours who all, bar one, have a significantly higher number. Bizarre situation as Ben Brennan breaks up Fianna Fáil-Fine Gael arrangement to take Graiguecullen-Portarlington vice-chair role RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp Previous articleBREAKING: 480 new cases of Coronavirus in Ireland and 25 more deathsNext articleCoronavirus Daily Noticeboard – Friday, April 10, 2020 Alan HartnettStradbally native Alan Hartnett is a graduate of Knockbeg College who has worked in the local and national media since 2008. Alan has a BA in Economics, Politics and Law and an MA in Journalism from DCU. His happiest moment was when Jody Dillon scored THAT goal in the Laois senior football final in 2016. Electric Picnic Kildare has the highest with 290 with Westmeath (152), Tipperary (151) and Offaly (88) coming next.While Carlow has the lowest number of any of our neighbours with 19 confirmed cases. Electric Picnic Facebooklast_img read more

DBRS confirms ‘AA’ rating for B.C.

Alberta hopes higher oil prices will power recovery DBRS has confirmed its AA credit rating for British Columbia, citing the province’s fiscal discipline and affordable debt burden. The rating agency indicates that the province uses conservative assumptions and modest contingencies in its budgets, “which has helped to establish a track record of prudent fiscal management.” It also notes that its fiscal performance has been very close to budgetary projections, and ranks as second best in the country. Looking ahead, a small surplus is expected for fiscal 2013-2014. “The debt burden remains consistent with previous expectations and very manageable for the credit profile,” it notes. Provincial finance minister, Michael de Jong, notes that B.C. also continues to maintain the highest credit rating possible with Moody’s and Standard and Poor’s. “This is not just confirmation of B.C.’s top rating among the provinces, but affirmation of the balanced approach we have taken over the past years,” De Jong said. “DBRS recognizes our fiscal discipline and relatively low and affordable debt. They also recognize that our fiscal recovery plan is on track and that our tax system is among the most competitive in Canada.” James Langton Keywords Budgets,  British Columbia B.C. budget forecasts three years of billion-dollar deficits Highlights of the British Columbia 2019 provincial budget Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Related news Facebook LinkedIn Twitter read more

Clarifying recent media commentary about incorrect JobKeeper payments

first_imgClarifying recent media commentary about incorrect JobKeeper payments JobKeeper is the largest ever administered program in Australia with payments to date exceeding $80 billion.It has been supported by a comprehensive and effective compliance program.Not only does this involve checking the ABN of every business and the tax file number of each and every employee claimed, the ATO also has red-flag checks to stop claims for fictitious employees including deceased, jailed and those overseas, and also fictitious employing businesses. This is over and above the use of Single Touch Payroll and other data sources.Where claims including fictitious employees are identified, no JobKeeper payments are or have been made.Contrary to the impression given by some media coverage, the 6,000 red-flagged cases under investigation relate to all attempted claims stopped for investigation prior to payment. There have been very few attempted claims for fictitious employees.The ATO is not aware of any ultimately successful claim for deceased or other fictitious employees.The effectiveness of the ATO’s approach to implementing JobKeeper and managing fraud was recently confirmed by the Australian National Audit Office (ANAO). These findings reflect the dedication of the thousands of employees across the ATO involved in delivering the Government’s stimulus package.ANAO review findings:The ATO has been effective in managing risks related to the rapid implementation of COVID-19 economic response measures.The ATO undertook appropriate planning to support the rapid implementation of the six economic response measures – predominantly using its existing systems and processes to support governance, resourcing, and consultation.The ATO’s risk documentation evidences its priority of implementing the measures in a timely manner, while also managing fraud and other integrity risks on a progressive basis.See also:ANAO report /Media Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:ATO, audit, Australia, Australian, Australian Taxation Office, business, coronavirus, covid-19, Employees, fraud, Government, investigation, JobKeeper, Media, stimulus package, taxlast_img read more

Queensland Government loan supports local tourism providers

first_imgQueensland Government loan supports local tourism providers Treasurer and Minister for Investment The Honourable Cameron DickThe Palaszczuk Government has provided a lifeline to hundreds of local Queensland tourism operators and suppliers. Treasurer and Minister for Investment Cameron Dick said a conditional loan was provided to Imperium Tourism Holdings through the government’s Industry Support Package. “Although Queensland’s tourism sector is now rebuilding, we know the sector faced incredible challenges in 2020 and is challenged again in 2021,” Mr Dick said.“When COVID-19 emerged and borders closed, tourists began cancelling trips and the tourism industry experienced significant cashflow problems affecting both customers and suppliers who were left out-of-pocket and awaiting payment.“This loan has enabled over 540 payments to Queensland tourism businesses and Queensland-based suppliers. “These businesses offer visitor experiences throughout regional Queensland such as tours, activities, day trips, travel and accommodation. “The loan provided to Imperium Tourism Holdings was structured using a trust account arrangement. This meant that payments were made directly to Queensland tourism operators and Queensland-based suppliers.“The terms of the agreement also require Imperium Tourism Holdings to repay the full amount of the loan plus interest to the Queensland Government.” /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:agreement, Australia, covid-19, Government, industry, Investment, loan, Minister, Palaszczuk, QLD, Queensland, tourism, travellast_img read more

Mulwaree River Walkway unlocks new trails

first_imgMulwaree River Walkway unlocks new trails Goulburn Mulwaree CouncilNew walking trails will be ready to explore in just a few weeks, with work underway on the river walkway link from Lower Sterne Street in Eastgrove through to Cemetery Street.This new part of the network is fully funded by Goulburn Mulwaree Council, and will be 1.5km length when completed by the end of June this year. Running along the Mulwaree River, it has been anecdotally named the Mulwaree River Walkway.“This area of Goulburn is just another gem waiting to be discovered, and I think many residents will be pleasantly surprised when the project is complete” said Mayor Bob Kirk.“The 1.5 kilometre walkway will feature a lot of native trees and bushland, and will pass under the railway line and then Sydney Road, before linking with Cemetery Street.”Following completion of this link, Council will shift focus to the next stage of the river walkway network, which will be 2.7km long and will link Cemetery Street with Josephs Gate subdivision.This section is being joint funded by the Federal Government and NSW Government, with $2 million contributed through the Bushfire Local Economic Recovery Fund. It will feature a low level river crossing behind the Goulburn Correctional Facility, with construction slated to begin towards the end of this year.Goulburn Mulwaree Council has completed over 10.3 kilometres of pathway as part of the river walkway network, with these two extensions to total a further 4.2 kilometres, bringing the total to 14.5 kilometres. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:bushfire, council, Discovery, Federal, federal government, Goulburn, Goulburn Mulwaree Council, Government, local council, NSW, project, running, Sydneylast_img read more

Honeymoons and wake-up calls

first_imgHoneymoons and wake-up calls Welcome to my second blog.My first eight weeks as National Data Guardian (NDG) have been my ‘honeymoon period’ and what I somewhat grandly titled my ‘listening exercise’. I’ve been meeting many people and organisations for the first time in role and getting to know the excellent Office of the National Data Guardian team. I’ve been excited and inspired, taken aback (sometimes at the same time) and curious hearing the range of sometimes very polarised views on data sharing, use, and risk / benefit balance. Many thanks to those I’ve met for their time.I’ve also found it striking the degree to which questions of data use appear often to be approached through the prism of broader questions such as those relating to individual and / or professional identity, or trust in institutions. Arguably distinct issues sometimes quickly become conflated, perhaps reflecting more fundamental tensions over our underlying shared values as citizens.As the honeymoon ends, as all must, I’ve perceived that there’s expectation in some quarters for the NDG to be able to exercise some form of omnipotent authority over health and care data. In situations of conflict, my own style of leadership aspires to be more honest-broker than a ‘Boudica’ brandishing a sword. More importantly, it is not the NDG role. In several conversations I’ve invoked the framework of the legislation that established the role to maintain the NDG is not a regulator that enforces, but rather an individual vested with the authority to produce guidance that organisations must have regard to – and to give advice and information about, and assistance in relation to, the processing of health and adult social care data in England. The Act is silent on to what extent that advice should be public.As you’d expect, I’ve also experienced an implied (or sometimes explicit) comparison with my predecessor as NDG, the late Dame Fiona Caldicott. I too find myself asking “what would Dame Fiona have done?”, and I find that a helpful question. I consider myself fortunate to have had the opportunity to meet with her over the last year in the run-up to my appointment and to benefit from some full and frank advice about approaching the challenges of the role. The NDG team and panel members have since been incredibly supportive in discussing the background to current issues, including the more ‘ancient’ history that shapes our current data landscape.All of which for me has brought the question of my own values sharply into focus. What will matter most in this role? Turning to the principles and values of the NHS Constitution is a good starting point, alongside the Seven Principles of Public Life. My experience thus far has led me to distil a further two personal values that feel particularly important now, namely to:Work with complexity and resist binary thinking – oversimplification of complex issues or polarisation of organisations or individuals into ‘good or bad’, whether for ideological or other purposes, is rarely helpful. I stand with Oscar Wilde here – ‘The truth is rarely pure and never simple’.Work with humility – recognising no expert is infallible, no solution or system is ever perfect. Health and care must be a learning system that seeks to continuously improve from both positive and negative experience. When things go wrong and / or mistakes are made, scapegoating and attributing incompetence or malign intent is usually unhelpful and inaccurate. What matters is how we learn together from what’s happened and what we do about it now, and that is my focus.No doubt, as my experience as NDG evolves, I’ll develop and refine those further. I suspect I’ll also be adding in something related to healthcare being an emotional business.As you may guess, the most pressing issue landing on my desk in these first few weeks has been the question of public trust, and my role in that, in relation to the General Practice Data for Planning and Research programme (GPDPR). The Office of the NDG has been actively involved in discussion of the initiative since 2018, alongside stakeholders including the Royal College of GPs and the British Medical Association. One of the key points of discussion has been the imperative to building on learning from previous data initiatives, including care.data and the National Data Opt-out, not least ensuring the right safeguards are in place and that this is clearly communicated to the public.From what I have seen since coming into post, learning from experience has resulted in the development of a programme which represents a step forward in terms of privacy safeguards, with data releases subject to a strong system of independent oversight. However, since its launch the benefits of the new GPDPR system have not come through in much of the media discourse. It appears that, in the absence of an alternative, a narrative has developed that this new initiative is essentially historically blind and a ‘data grab’ for possibly nefarious purposes. Such accounts often make no reference to the multiple different data collections from primary care that already exist, their range of purposes, or the aging technical system that GPDPR replaces. Concerns about commercial companies accessing data have also clearly been very significant for many people.Communicating about this data collection clearly was also going to be of paramount importance – as important as making sure the technical details, security arrangements and safeguards were well designed. The importance of building a clear communications campaign so that the public could see what would and would not be done with data has been at the heart of the advice given by the NDG office and panel to this programme over the past years. This advice was in keeping with the new Caldicott Principle 8 that there should be ‘no surprises’ for patients and the public in terms of how health and care data is used. I have been intensely involved in discussions over this last week about the need to allow more time for communications. I’m very pleased by the decision to delay the launch for these questions to be addressed.It’s essential we all now work together as a system, with humility and honesty, to actively engage with public concerns to ensure there are ‘no surprises’, and I look forward to playing my role in that. One of the ways we achieve this is by providing citizens with the information they need, presented in a way that is sufficiently clear. This will allow them to make their own informed view on the purpose and trustworthiness of the system and its processes, including security, privacy protection and how decisions are made, with clear information about opting out, and what that means in practice if they do.We all ultimately approach questions of health and care data as individuals, both in what we choose to share with health and care professionals, and then how we exercise our rights regarding how that information is used. Our individual approaches depend on a range of factors, including on how we balance risks and benefits in the light of our personal experience, priorities and wider concerns.Personally, I have chosen not to opt out. I’ve shared that private information mindful that Dame Fiona Caldicott decided to take the step of publicly disclosing the same. I am satisfied with the purpose, safeguards and oversight of the GPDPR. And I am concerned that if large numbers of people do opt out because our systems are not shown to be trustworthy, then that will result in poorer quality, unrepresentative data sets for health research and system planning, which ultimately will be seriously to the detriment of improving health and care for us all.Now as my listening exercise of the past two months concludes, I will be laying out my priorities for the coming year in more detail in the NDG annual report, to be published this summer. In the meantime, I welcome your feedback and thoughts via ndgoffice /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:British, campaign, communications, conflict, Constitution, exercise, general practice, Government, health, healthcare, identity, leadership, legislation, planning, primary care, research, security, UK, UK Governmentlast_img read more

Prairie High School Drama Club presents musical comedy ‘Curtains’

first_imgPrairie High School Drama Club presents musical comedy ‘Curtains’Posted by ClarkCountyToday.comDate: Tuesday, October 15, 2019in: Community News, Youthshare 0 Six performances scheduled beginning Fri., Nov. 1 VANCOUVER — Prairie High School Drama presents the musical comedy whodunit “Curtains” beginning Nov. 1. Prairie High School Drama presents the musical comedy whodunit “Curtains” beginning Nov. 1.Prairie High School Drama presents the musical comedy whodunit “Curtains” beginning Nov. 1. It’s the brassy, bright, and promising year of 1959. Boston’s Colonial Theatre is host to the opening night performance of a new musical. When the leading lady mysteriously dies on stage, the entire cast and crew are suspects. Enter a local detective, who just happens to be a musical theatre fan.Packed with glorious tunes and a witty, charming script filled with delightful characters, “Curtains” is a hilarious journey for both performers and the audience. The Broadway production garnered 8 nominations at the 2007 Tony Awards, including Best Musical.Performances will be at Prairie High School, 11311 NE 119th St., Vancouver. Tickets can be purchased online at www.prairiedramaclub.com and cost $5 for students, $10 for senior citizens, and $12 for adults.The performance dates and times are:Fri., Nov. 1 at 7 p.m.Sat., Nov. 2 at 1 p.m.Sat., Nov. 2 at 7 p.m.Fri., Nov. 8 at 7 p.m.Sat., Nov. 9 at 1 p.m.Sat., Nov. 9 at 7 p.m.Information provided by Battle Ground Public Schools.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textTags:Brush PrairieClark Countyshare 0 Previous : Chelatchie Prairie Railroad to offer Headless Horseman Train Ride Next : Battle Ground schools a step closer to new sexual health curriculumAdvertisementThis is placeholder text Name*Email*Website guestLabel guestLabel Name*Email*Websitecenter_img I allow to create an accountWhen you login first time using a Social Login button, we collect your account public profile information shared by Social Login provider, based on your privacy settings. We also get your email address to automatically create an account for you in our website. Once your account is created, you’ll be logged-in to this account.DisagreeAgree 0 Comments Inline FeedbacksView all comments Subscribe Connect with LoginI allow to create an accountWhen you login first time using a Social Login button, we collect your account public profile information shared by Social Login provider, based on your privacy settings. We also get your email address to automatically create an account for you in our website. Once your account is created, you’ll be logged-in to this account.DisagreeAgreeNotify of new follow-up comments new replies to my comments I allow to use my email address and send notification about new comments and replies (you can unsubscribe at any time). last_img read more

Don’t persecute the tinkerers, celebrate them

first_imgCreated with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2 Geoff Penney and his tools As for that judge in Harbeson, Delaware, somewhere Geoff Penney just pulled the cap off a beer for you, sir. Thank you. As housing prices started to climb, we’d often wondered who would start the ball rolling to get all lawyered up to strip Geoff down. But time and again, nothing happened. I’d heard there had been rumbling years before my time, but nothing came of them. Because it wasn’t just that Geoff could fix old cars, it was that Geoff could make a house call and fix your fridge, that he could get you going on that snowy morning when no way was CAA gonna get you to work on time, and Geoff could unbreak the lawnmower your kid broke by running over something that to this day he won’t admit what – the kid, not Geoff.Geoff was never without a rag in one hand and a wrench in the other, and conversations moved with the grace of an expert juggler. He could add in one, then two, then three people, all while fiddling with a chainsaw or peering into the back of a clock that had mysteriously stopped ticking off the moments.He was fascinated by machinery, and it spoke to him. With Geoff, you didn’t have to “just go buy a new one,” anathema to anyone who has respect for quality craftsmanship, a hard-earned dollar or endless landfills. We need the tinkerers, the fixers, the engineers, the craftsmen and the mechanics. And we need these people so we can learn, or at least respect that which is growing scarcer every year.We diagnose our cars with computers now, or perhaps more aptly, we diagnose our computers with computers. We’ve lost at least a generation of handing down the tools and the knowledge that did far more than change oil filters and swap out winter tires. We’ve lost the time and the stories and the bonding, between parents and children and between neighbours, which went with the territory of that guy who could fix everything and took as much delight as the doubting owner when something dead sprang back to life.There is a middle ground between rusted out hulks littering the landscape and a landscape for learning and fixing those things that are broken. Just like all that glitters is not gold, all that waits patiently for repair is not rot.Geoff Penney died suddenly just over three years ago. I knew then it would be a tremendous blow for his family and friends, but the loss to our little community continues. So here’s to the fixers and the engine whisperers who live among us and support their communities in ways we sometimes forget to value in our rush to scrub this up and wash that down.  Buy It! Princess Diana’s humble little 1981 Ford Escort is up for auction An engagement gift from Prince Charles, the car is being sold by a Princess Di “superfan” RELATED TAGSNewsDelawareGeoff PenneyUnited StatesWinston Churchill ‹ Previous Next › See More Videos Trending Videos COMMENTSSHARE YOUR THOUGHTScenter_img The Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car ever If you’re lucky, you have someone in your loop, either socially or geographically, who can fix things. I had Geoff Penney, one street over, who no doubt would have ended up facing down the lawyers of those Harbeson, Delaware, crankyfaces if they’d been his neighbours. The Penney house is on a beautiful street, a real estate hot spot, and his drive usually sported several vehicles in various states of repair. His garage was a catacomb of many eras, a maze of the unknown to the untrained eye but a bonanza of riches to Geoff. Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Geoff Penney advertisement We encourage all readers to share their views on our articles using Facebook commenting Visit our FAQ page for more information. Sometimes people work from home. Maybe you have no idea this is so, if it’s someone like me who quietly types in my kitchen and is only handy for receiving must-be-signed-for packages when you’re out. But maybe it’s something a little more visual, more in-your-face. Maybe someone has a few cars scattered around the yard, and maybe this is against local bylaws. Or maybe they just have one old car that hasn’t moved since Winston Churchill was in power, and you would like it gone.I’ve been following the legal unfolding of such a case in Harbeson, Delaware (population: 973), where a local man has built an admittedly large (over 1,900 square feet, or 178 square metres) four-car garage, complete with lifts. The owner is a gearhead who now uses a wheelchair, and he lets his friends wrench in the space and he also does work for others – and doesn’t charge them. So of course his neighbours are suing him, and a judge just batted that out of the sky like an anti-aircraft missile.This little story from a little town is actually much bigger than some bickering neighbours putting their snouts into another’s business, and it’s bigger than whether your idea of neighbour beautification involves more tulips than steel. This is about the contributions we make to our communities, and the respect we hold for those who aren’t just like us. Trending in Canada PlayThe Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car everPlay3 common new car problems (and how to prevent them) | Maintenance Advice | Driving.caPlayFinal 5 Minivan Contenders | Driving.caPlay2021 Volvo XC90 Recharge | Ministry of Interior Affairs | Driving.caPlayThe 2022 Ford F-150 Lightning is a new take on Canada’s fave truck | Driving.caPlayBuying a used Toyota Tundra? Check these 5 things first | Used Truck Advice | Driving.caPlayCanada’s most efficient trucks in 2021 | Driving.caPlay3 ways to make night driving safer and more comfortable | Advice | Driving.caPlayDriving into the Future: Sustainability and Innovation in tomorrow’s cars | Driving.ca virtual panelPlayThese spy shots get us an early glimpse of some future models | Driving.ca last_img read more